Sunday, October 18, 2015

What's so kosher about kosher salt? Get all the facts, myths, and tips.


It's taken over the gourmet world.  You pretty much wouldn't write a recipe that includes salt without it.  It's also an annoying fact of life for those of us googling "kosher" recipes - that yummy salt bumps up almost every recipe to the top of the list even if it's a recipe for bacon double cheeseburgers.

First of all, you may already know that "kosher" salt is no more or less kosher than any other salt.  That is, it's kosher, but so is table salt, coarse salt, sea salt, Himalayan pink mountain salt, and every other form of pure salt.

So if you eat kosher and cook kosher, you CAN use kosher salt.  But you don’t have to.

So why is it called kosher?

That’s actually just a mistake.  This flattish crystalline form of salt is actually kosher-ING salt - the kind of salt used to "kasher" meat to make it kosher.

Most kosher salt has air between relatively flat crystals.  So when you're using or substituting kosher salt, use "more" of it - the same amount by weight looks like more on a spoon, so 2 tsp of regular table salt will be just as salty as 1 tbsp or more of kosher salt.  Many people claim it has a “lighter” flavour, but in reality, it tastes the same as any other salt – you’re just using less of it.

Here’s a picture showing a comparison between different types of salt, close-up:

Friday, September 4, 2015

Freeze the lime in the coconut (with just a touch of chocolate, mm-hmm)

If you’ve ever heard the “Lime in the Coconut” song – don’t worry.  There’s no “bellyaching” here, just a whole fluffy heap of summer-Shabbos deliciousness.

On a hot day, it feels like there is no taste more perfect than lime and coconut mixed together.

Happily, I discovered a couple of years ago that you can WHIP the cream that rises to the top of coconut milk.  Is there anything more perfect, you ask?  No, there is not.

Well, okay... it does get a little more perfect, when you stir in just a small handful of tiny chocolate chips.  Mini chocolate chips work best, because they're awesomely subtle, but really, who's going to complain that their chocolate chips are too big?

Here is the basic premise of this, the easiest and perhaps most perfect of all whipped desserts:


This isn't exactly a recipe, more like a method.  You'll need well-chilled coconut milk or coconut cream, so stick it in the fridge overnight before you open the tin. 

Only use the coconut cream that's congealed.  Whatever liquid is in there after you scoop out the white stuff is incredibly tasty on chicken, so hang onto it and use it for something else, because it definitely won't whip.

  • Pull out 2 tins of well-chilled coconut milk. 
  • Before it can warm up, skim off the solid white stuff on top and add it to a bowl.
  • Add 2-3 cubes of frozen lime juice (maybe 4-8 Tbsp?), to taste.  If lime juice is frozen, let it thaw a little before starting to whip.
  • Add 1/2 cup of sugar.
  • Whip the white stuff until it gets reasonably firm (it may take a while if it's a warm day, but it WILL whip, so keep going).

Once mixture is fully whipped, gently stir in chocolate chips and transfer to freezer.

That's it - enjoy!!!  Let me know if you love this as much as I do. <3

[lime/coconut photo © Alex Gorzen via Flickr]

Tzivia / צִיבְיָה

Monday, August 31, 2015

Magically healthy panko-baked sweet potato puffs

Are you sick of kugels but aren’t sure what else you can make to serve on the side of a Shabbos or Yom Tov meal?  Here’s something that’s just as EASY as a kugel, only in tasty, crunchy, bite-sized morsels.
Last week, I wanted something like the Alexa brand sweet potato “tater tots,” which by all accounts are absolutely delicious.  We can’t buy them here, so I knew I had to make something from scratch.  My puffs came out totally different, but utterly delightful in their own right.  They’re a great way to sneak even more of that sweet potato goodness onto your family’s menu.
Plus, they’re terrifically simple:
Bake or boil the sweepoes (I boiled mine), puree them with egg yolks, cornstarch and seasoning, and then coat the mixture with panko before baking.  I added a little melted coconut oil to the sweet potatoes; you could probably leave it out OR substitute canola if you wanted something subtler (there wasn’t a strong coconut taste, however).
Everybody loved the taste and texture of these!
Here, I’m pureeing the sweet potato.  I added everything in here:  egg yolks, cornstarch, coconut oil, salt and pepper, plus a little cinnamon.  You can leave the cinnamon out if you don’t like it.
I let the mixture sit in the fridge for a while in the food processor bowl to firm up a bit before scooping it out.  I think this really helped, though it was still rather mushy.
Happily, we had panko (Japanese bread crumbs) in the house.  I mixed in a little melted coconut oil, plus salt and pepper.  Then, I just dropped in the sweet potato mixture by tablespoons-full.  Because they were so mushy, I tossed crumbs over them lightly with a fork to make sure they were completely coated before transferring to the baking pan.

Friday, May 22, 2015

We be (Gulab) Jamun… an out-of-the-ordinary dairy dessert for Shavuos / Shavuot

homemade kosher gulab jamun (Indian sweet dessert) for Shavuot

When I first found out that Judaism had a holiday specifically for celebrating dairy foods, my first thought wasn't cheesecake.  My first thought was... gulab jamun.

What the heck are gulab jamun???

If you love Indian food as much as I do, you probably already know.

I grew up eating a lot of Indian food, and once I started keeping kosher, I missed it most of all.  More than Chinese, Thai, or KFC put together. (Maybe not more than real dim sum!)

When I was a toddler, my father flew to India with an Indian friend and had the time of his life.  He came back with a pair of lovely white linen "day pyjamas" that he'd save for special occasions, a love of delicate nose piercings and an insatiable appetite for Indian food.

(For some weird reason, my father hated ear piercings for girls but told me as I grew up that it would be just fine if I got my nose pierced.  And indeed, he didn't flinch when I eventually got one.)

Ah, but Indian food.  Fortunately, that was one appetite which he shared generously with us (except his love of okra).

Since moving to Israel, I've been on a quest for good Indian food here, which has not really gone well.  There was a place in Jerusalem for a while, but apparently it is no longer under hashgacha.  The food wasn't THAT great anyway, at least, not compared to the Coxwell & Gerard corridor I used to haunt in Toronto before I started keeping kosher.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Keep it cool all summer long with freezer pop molds under $10

Keep it cool all summer long with freezer pop molds under $10

Do you have a problem with ice cubes?

Come on, hands up.  I know I do. 

Working in one of the World’s Tiniest Kitchens, I appreciate any solution that saves space, time, money, and hassle.  And living in Israel, I need – desperately! – to stay cool all summer long. 

Oh, yeah, and if I can spend less than ten bucks, all the better.

Last summer, I bought these silicone freezer pop molds for my husband.  Back in Toronto, he had a brand of storebought freezable juice pops that were 100% juice that he loved as a refreshing summertime treat.  Here, everything is made with a ton of sugar, so I thought he could use these to make his own.

Aren’t they pretty?

A bouquet of gorgeous silicone freezer pop molds

(If you click the pics, you’ll be taken to the best-rated freezer pop molds I could find on Amazon – I bought mine locally.)

Weirdly, and to my great sadness, my husband didn’t take to them.  So they’ve mostly sat empty and unused for the last year.  But when the weather here started heating up last month, I had a flash of realization:  ICE!

Ice, in cube form, is a problem for us for a few reasons:

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Meatless Eggy Muffins – quick cure for “hangry” (hungry + angry) mornings


How hangry do you and your kids get in the morning?  (Or afternoon, depending on how late you've slept in and/or procrastinated.)

Around here, the answer is... VERY.

These quick, easy, eggy muffins are exactly what you need:  the cure for Hangry.  Shh… don’t tell anybody: they’re basically little mini-quiches, just without a crust.

These are sometimes called "scrambled egg muffins."  But on most sites, you'll find them chock-full of some type of meat that just won't work in a kosher kitchen.  Pork, ham and bacon are all super-popular at breakfast time, apparently.

Even if you could use some kosher kind of meat, you'd miss out on all the cheesy goodness of these delighful, bite-sized breakfast treats.  So why bother?  Just toss in lots of veggies and you'll never miss the bacon, I promise.

egg muffins, good enough to eat!

Make your life super-easy and prepare these in reusable silicone muffin cups. 

I didn’t used to like the idea of these, but after a few times of using them for candy and other baked things, I’m sold.  Plus, they’re colourful, cute, and keep your hands from getting greasy.  (They’re sometimes a little tricky to wash after baking things with flour, like muffins, because of all the creases.)

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